Amy Helm

Bonfire Presents, a Philly Residency with:

Amy Helm

The Mallett Brothers

Wed, March 15, 2017

7:00 pm

$15.00

This event is 21 and over

Amy Helm
Amy Helm
"I'm just trying to tell some stories as honestly as I can," Amy Helm says of ​Didn't It Rain, ​her first solo album and her eOne Music debut.

Although the personally charged, organically soulful ​Didn't It Rain ​is her first release under her own name, Amy Helm has been making music for most of her life. She's already won widespread praise as a singer, songwriter and live performer, first as a member of the celebrated alt­country collective Ollabelle and subsequently for her extensive work with her father, musical icon Levon Helm, who passed away in 2012.

Blessed with a commanding, deeply expressive voice and an uncanny songwriting skill that instinctively draws upon a deep well of American musical traditions, Amy Helm delivers a timelessly powerful statement with Didn't It Rain.

The spellbinding dozen­song set is rooted in first­person experience, exploring universal themes of life, love and loss on such musically and emotionally resonant originals as the smoldering soul ballad "Rescue Me," the hushed, lilting "Deep Water," the meditative "Roll Away" and the stark, haunting "Wild Girl." Complementing Helm's originals are her personalized takes on the Sam Cooke classic "Good News" and the traditional title track, which she delivers with the heartfelt gospel urgency that's always been an element of her vocal persona.

Accompanying Helm on ​Didn't It Rain​ is an impressive roster of players and singers that demonstrates the esteem in which the artist is held by her peers. Helm's former Ollabelle bandmate Byron Isaacs, who produced the album, co­wrote the majority of the songs with Helm, and is featured as one­third of Helm's current live trio the Handsome Strangers, playing bass alongside guitarist Daniel Littleton and drummer David Berger. Also contributing their talents are Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne; guitarists Larry Campbell, Chris Masterson and Jim Weider; keyboardists Marco Benevento, John Medeski and Brian Mitchell; and guest backup vocalists Carolyn Leonhart, Elizabeth Mitchell, Allison Moorer, Catherine Russell and Teresa Williams.

Didn't It Rain ​also marked the final recording sessions of Levon Helm, who acted as the project's executive producer as well as adding his unmistakable drumming on three tracks; Levon's distinctive count­off can be heard kicking off Amy's rousing take on Martha Scanlan's "Spend Our Last Dime."

Helm had originally planned to release her solo debut a bit sooner, but chose to substantially rework the album that she initially recorded, recutting more than half of the songs with the road­tested Handsome Strangers.

"That was kind of a reckless move financially, and it's resulted in the album coming out two years later than I originally thought it would, but it was the right thing to do," she acknowledges. "When I started the record, I'd never done a gig under my own name, and I was still getting comfortable with the idea of being a solo artist. I thought I'd finished the record, but then I started going out on the road, and the stuff that we were doing live was so much stronger thanwhat I had recorded, and I started feeling more confidence and focus. So we went back in the studio, with no money and no budget, and found a way to do it and get it right."

Many of ​Didn't It Rain​'s songs are the product of an extended period during which the artist endured a series of personal trials and life changes, including the April 2012 passing of her father and chief musical mentor.

"The past few years have been profoundly transformative for me, so I wanted to tell some of those stories as honestly as I could," she asserts. "I thought about the people I had lost, and things that had fallen apart and things that were coming together, and that influenced the way I sang these songs."

Amy Helm began connecting with audiences early in life, playing her first gig in her early teens in a Manhattan bar and drifting informally through a series of combos before her father recruited her to join his live band. She also absorbed musical and personal inspiration from her mother, noted singer/songwriter Libby Titus; and her stepfather, Steely Dan co­mastermind Donald Fagen, who offered Amy additional opportunities to find herself as a performer.

"I always did gigs through high school and college," she explains, "but my fears and insecurities kept me from committing to it. That's when my dad became a huge influence; he scooped me up when I was in my mid ­20s and put me in this blues band. I was very, very green, but I got my road­dog status with him. It was like walking through fire every time I got on stage, but it forced me to decide if I wanted to do this. And I decided that I absolutely wanted to do it."

Amy's vocal and songwriting talents soon found a home in the New York­ based Ollabelle, whose three acclaimed albums and countless live gigs saw her evolve into a confident, charismatic performer. She also resumed her musical collaboration with her father, singing and playing in his band, playing on and co­producing his Grammy­ winning 2007 comeback album Dirt Farmer​, and helping to organize the now­legendary Midnight Ramble concerts at Levon's home studio in Woodstock, NY.

"He was the best teacher, in so many ways," Amy says of her father. "He wasn't interested in overthinking anything; all he cared about was playing music. He saw himself as a working musician, and it was serious business and it had to be right. Playing side by side with him in the Ramble band for ten years, and building those shows with him, really changed the way I approached things, and his humility influenced and shaped me as a musician, as it did everyone who played with him."

With ​Didn't It Rain​ reintroducing her to the world as a solo artist, Helm says that her immediate plan is "to just get out and play as many gigs as possible. I think that the job of a musician is to try and shake people out of their own heads for an hour or two, and bring some joy into the world. So I want to get out there and do the job the best I can."
The Mallett Brothers
The Mallett Brothers Band is a nationally touring alt-country/rock band from Maine. Slightly more rock than country, theirs is a musical melting pot that's influenced equally by folk and singer/songwriter influences as by harder rock, punk and psychedelic sounds. Led by brothers Luke and Will Mallett, the band is rounded out by Brian Higgins on drums, Nick Leen on bass, Matt Mills on lead guitar, pedal steel and banjo, and Wally on dobro and electric guitar. It's song-driven music that holds up under the lens of solitary listening, but that's equally apt to crank a room full of rockers into whiskey-fueled high gear.

Since forming in 2009, the band has released three full length albums and toured the country extensively, providing support for acts ranging from The Josh Abbot Band, Blackberry Smoke, Charlie Robison, and the Turnpike Troubadours, to .38 Special, Toby Keith, Chris Caigle, and Travis Tritt. Their touring circuit stretches from the Appalachian to the Rocky Mountains, from Maine to Mississippi, and they've appeared at some of the finest music venues in the country, including the Continental Club in Austin, the legendary Gruene Hall in New Braunfels TX, the Birchmere in Alexandria VA, the Bluebird in Nashville, Meadowbrook Pavilion in NH, and more.

Accolades and awards and quotes and such...

"When we first listen to a band, our brain reflexively logs them under the most fitting genre masthead, waiting for the next time your itch for "noise-core goth rock" needs to be scratched. Rare are the bands that challenge the inexorable classification by playing whatever the hell they want. Take a gamble to overthrow the whole system by listening to New England's wildly eclectic crew of genre rebels, The Mallett Brothers Band." -Texas Hill Country Explore

The Mallett Brothers Band was named best band in New England, and recieved best album in New England for "LAND" at the New England Music Awards this year. Sharing the nomination with some powerhouse bands such as Kingsley Flood and Deer Tick made these awards even more of a nice surprise.

No Depression says they "make you want to scream at people to make them aware of the awesomeness that they are more than likely missing."

Dispatch Magazine calls them a "six-piece living inferno."

They have been "gobbling up accolades like sunflower seeds" since their 2009 inception, according to the Portland Press Herald.

Their debut record was the top-selling local CD at Bull Moose Music (Maine, New Hampshire) in 2010; and their sophomore release, "Low Down," was featured on several year-end best-of lists, nationally as well as locally.

They've been featured on WCYY, WBLM, WTHT, MPBN, WCLZ, and Nashville.com Country Radio, stations whose specialties run the gamut from mainstream country to hard rock to adult contemporary, and podcasts including the Americana Rock Mix, Freezing Process, Nine Bullets Radio, Freight Train Boogie, and RootHog Radio, among others.

The Portland Phoenix says "This band projects a self-assuredness that's infectious in a world where it's becoming harder and harder to find things that are real and genuine." The Wire says "Put simply, this is a damn good band." Hidden Track says "a most welcome discovery." The Orris says "a band to watch." The Portland Press Herald says "Scour the songs [on "Low Down"] for layered hipster nuance, and you'll later be smoking cloves wondering what just blew past you." Deli Magazine says of their live performances, "I guarantee you a kick-ass time, a hangover, and a crush that won't quit." They've also been called "amazing" (Piscataquis Observer), "luminaries" (NonAlignmentPact), "mighty," and "as real as the dirt on the bottoms of your shoes" (Press Herald). At their March 2011 hometown performance at Portland's Port City Music Hall, more alcohol was allegedly consumed than at any other local show in the venue's history.
Venue Information:
MilkBoy
1100 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19107